Bear Sighting – DeSoto County

Bear Sighting – DeSoto County

Sometimes a photographer just has to get lucky…

I was down in the Coldwater River Bottoms near Highway 305 shooting photos of wildlife this morning. For those who may not know, when I am not working on a new novel, I try to get out and take wildlife photos. (Okay: Truth in advertising–or I am not doing whatever the wife needs to have done first.) Today, however, I was free. Problem was, things were pretty slow this morning with only a few shots, of some birds and deer.

This is the one of the deer—a doe and two yearlings—not a great shot, but what the heck. Every shot can’t be a classic.

Junco in The Snow

I also got these birds, a junco in the snow, and a thrush looking pitifully about for some sunshine.

It had grown cloudy again.

Thrush: “Is it spring yet?”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sparrow

This sparrow shot was one of many, but I did get a pretty decent photo of a bluebird in a cedar tree. I may actually post this one on my photography website.

Bluebird in Cedar

The swamps and canals remain frozen, so there were no ducks, waterfowl, beavers and such anywhere around. I gave up a little before noon and headed back to the pickup.

It was nothing to write home about, but I’m not complaining. It was a pretty good morning spent ghosting around in the river bottoms in search of critters. Little did I know I was about to be the most famous bear photographer in DeSoto County. Yup, I always did want to be famous–have groupies and order my olives stuffed with jalapenos instead of pimento.

I cranked the old pickup truck and eased up the dirt road toward the blacktop. Thankfully it was still frozen, and I had no problems getting out of the bottoms.

As I was coming up Adair Lane toward the highway I was having visions of hot coffee with eggs, bacon, and grits, when I glanced to my left and there he was—a bear.

I could “bearly” believe my eyes. (Sorry, couldn’t resist that one.) Having often heard folks tell of sightings that include cougars, Big Foot and other such “rarities” while almost never producing photographic evidence, I was determined to get something that proved I had seen this critter. Stopping my pickup, I grabbed my camera. Luckily it was on the seat beside me with the telephoto lens still attached.

The bear seemed to be resting against a tree and mesmerized by the warming temperatures. And in case you thought me foolhardy, rest easy. I didn’t dare get out of my truck, but rolled down the window, and got my photo. The animal seemed content and never moved. He was still there when I drove away. By the way, this one did not at all resemble our native black bears, not even the Ole Miss variety, so perhaps someone with a little more knowledge of wildlife can tell us exactly what kind of bear it is. The photo is below.

Incidentally: With the good lord above watching my every move, I give my word, this is exactly how I found him, and the photo was in no way staged. I checked with some of the locals down there, and they too have seen him previously. After seeing my photo, the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks has declared no interest in this bear sighting–typical government coverup.

Monster Bear in DeSoto County Mississippi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You may also enjoyBucks Bears and Wildfire and The Nature of Things in Mississippi

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Tallahatchie 2nd Edition

The Tallahatchie 2nd Edition is Now Available.

This is the new cover for the Tallahatchie 2nd Edition

Not only does the new Tallahatchie 2nd Edition have a new cover by designer Todd Hebertson (www.BookCoverArt.webs.com), it also has a newly redesigned interior with text edits included to better tell the story of Jack Hartman and his visit to the Mississippi Delta. Of course, I must give credit where it is due, so I want to pass on my special thanks to Dana Delamar (www.byyoursideselfpub.com) for the interior design, and to Danna Shirley and Carol Carlson for their help with editing and proofing.

Now available in both paperback and Kindle editions the Tallahatchie 2nd Edition can be purchased from the Amazon website at: (https://www.amazon.com/Tallahatchie-Southern-Fiction-Book-1-ebook/dp/B01I49BZAC).

And…for the first time, the Tallahatchie 2nd Edition, is also available in a hardcover edition. Contact me via the contact form on this site (www.rickdestefanis.com/contact) for more information.

Here are excerpts from a couple of reviews of Tallahatchie:

At its heart, good fiction (southern or any other kind) is about good characters, half of whom you want to smack or laugh at, and all the action, feel, or setting won’t make up for weak ones. The author…absolutely nails a time and a region and it is a very well written story. …it is simply a really good novel. Period!

–William F. Brown, Author

WOW! …DeStefanis has proven to be a consummate story-teller, (as he) paints an incredible picture of life in the poor, impoverished Mississippi (Delta), with water skis, and bass fishing, and truck stops, sweet tea, and trips to the river casinos, and deer hunting, and a crazy employee related to the sheriff, and Memphis Blues…The story-telling reminds me of some of the best non-lawyer fiction by Mississippi favorite John Grisham—like A Painted House.

–Robert Enzenauer

Check it out yourself. I think you will be delighted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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