Melody Hill – A Vietnam War Novel

A Vietnam War novel about a young paratrooper with the 101st Airborne who is recruited into a Special Ops Unit controlled by a rogue CIA Agent

Book #1 of The Vietnam War Series, Melody Hill, is the story of Duff Coleridge, a young man from the mountains of Tennessee. Duff would choose his hometown of Melody Hill over heaven any day, but he realizes his only chance for a better life is to leave home and join the military. The year is 1966 and Duff becomes a paratrooper with orders for the First Brigade of the 101st Airborne. He is on his way to Vietnam.

Rapidly becoming a natural warrior, Duff’s reputation with a Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol unit leads him into the shadowy world of black ops. Too late, he discovers his CIA boss is more rogue than “company” man. And when a mysterious French-Vietnamese woman approaches Duff, he becomes trapped in a dangerous web of romance, lies, and intrigue. Should he trust his dubious leader’s assessment of this beautiful woman as a potential Vietcong spy? Knowing the wrong decision could lead him into a deadly trap, Duff is determined to find the truth before it’s too late.

A Vietnam War novel with writing that has been widely compared to the likes of Tim O’brien’s, The Things They Carried and John Del Vecchio’s The 13th Valley, Melody Hill does not disappoint. Expertly crafted with historical accuracy, Melody Hill is an excellent Vietnam War Novel and military fiction at its best, challenging espionage thrillers as well as military romance books with its broad appeal. You don’t want to miss this thrilling prequel to the award-winning novel, The Gomorrah Principle. 

Learn more about Melody Hill’s reviews and awards here

Melody Hill Purchase Options

PRINTeBOOK  

amazon

kindle
 

 

You may also enjoy my other books below:

Gomorrah Principle: A Vietnam War Sniper Story

Raeford’s MVP: Military Fiction with a Love Story

Valley of the Purple Hearts: Book #4 of my Vietnam War Series

Tallahatchie: Southern Fiction and Dark Comedy

Rawlings, No Longer Young: A Western Historical Fiction Novel

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Recent Posts

I Don’t Write Sergeant Rock Comic Books!

That’s right. I don’t write Sergeant Rock comic books. Let me explain further. This is a recent unrated review I posted on the Goodreads site about my novel Raeford’s MVP:

“This is a love story and a story of finding one’s self and a future after facing the death and carnage of war–the Vietnam War. Billy Coker’s wild high school years led him down the primrose path to the war in Vietnam, and when it was over, he was left staring into the black abyss of PTSS and a futureless life. Little does he realize his redemption may depend on two women: a little six-year-old girl who has lost her father to that same war and a little fat girl he shunned in high school. It is the third book in the Vietnam War Series and one of my favorites.”

(https://www.goodreads.com/author/dashboard)

A novel about love, war and redemption.

You may ask why I would review my own book. The purpose is simple, but first let me begin by saying: There is no rating attached to the review nor is there a recommendation—only a story summary. The reason for the review is to clarify my purpose and style of writing in the Vietnam War Series. I have received a few review comments for Raeford’s MVP and my other works whereby an extremely limited number of readers express disappointment that my stories are not purely “war” stories.

 

Here are a couple of comments: “Is this a War Novel or a Romantic Novel?” (Valley of The Purple Hearts) and “This author…has a tendency to morph a Nam novel into a romance novel.” (Raeford’s MVP). I believe the problem lies with reader expectations. Some want nothing more than stories of combat and its immediate results. The problem with this is two-fold: wars and combat do not happen in a vacuum whereby they affect only the combatants, and the effects of war and combat seldom end when a soldier returns home.

Soldiers have lives before and after they are soldiers, and soldiers have families, wives, and lovers who are just as much a part of their lives as are their combat experiences. And while most soldiers return from combat to civilian lives and move on without outwardly displaying the effects of that experience, most all are changed in some way by it. Frankly, I write my novels to fit these realities and not the voyeuristic pleasures of readers who believe war games like “Call of Duty” or comic books such as “Sergeant Rock” reflect the horrific reality of combat and its aftermath.

With that said, I must caution readers that all these novels do in fact contain very real and graphic descriptions of combat. Many readers have said my stories seemingly place them in such a state of mind that they feel they have participated in the actual combat scenes. These accolades are deeply appreciated, because to understand the entirety of the experience is to better understand the combat veteran, but I stand by my opening statement: I don’t write Sergeant Rock comic books!

Send me your comments, and check out all my novels available in Kindle, paperback and hardcover editions on Amazon.com at  https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00H2YO2SS.

Rick DeStefanis

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