Melody Hill – A Vietnam War Novel

A Vietnam War novel about a young paratrooper with the 101st Airborne who is recruited into a Special Ops Unit controlled by a rogue CIA Agent

Book #1 of The Vietnam War Series, Melody Hill, is the story of Duff Coleridge, a young man from the mountains of Tennessee. Duff would choose his hometown of Melody Hill over heaven any day, but he realizes his only chance for a better life is to leave home and join the military. The year is 1966 and Duff becomes a paratrooper with orders for the First Brigade of the 101st Airborne. He is on his way to Vietnam.

Rapidly becoming a natural warrior, Duff’s reputation with a Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol unit leads him into the shadowy world of black ops. Too late, he discovers his CIA boss is more rogue than “company” man. And when a mysterious French-Vietnamese woman approaches Duff, he becomes trapped in a dangerous web of romance, lies, and intrigue. Should he trust his dubious leader’s assessment of this beautiful woman as a potential Vietcong spy? Knowing the wrong decision could lead him into a deadly trap, Duff is determined to find the truth before it’s too late.

A Vietnam War novel with writing that has been widely compared to the likes of Tim O’brien’s, The Things They Carried and John Del Vecchio’s The 13th Valley, Melody Hill does not disappoint. Expertly crafted with historical accuracy, Melody Hill is an excellent Vietnam War Novel and military fiction at its best, challenging espionage thrillers as well as military romance books with its broad appeal. You don’t want to miss this thrilling prequel to the award-winning novel, The Gomorrah Principle. 

Learn more about Melody Hill’s reviews and awards here

Melody Hill Purchase Options

PRINTeBOOK  

amazon

kindle
 

 

You may also enjoy my other books below:

Gomorrah Principle: A Vietnam War Sniper Story

Raeford’s MVP: Military Fiction with a Love Story

Valley of the Purple Hearts: Book #4 of my Vietnam War Series

Tallahatchie: Southern Fiction and Dark Comedy

Rawlings, No Longer Young: A Western Historical Fiction Novel

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Recent Posts

The Birdhouse Man and a Visit to North Carolina

The Birdhouse Man
Research Trip to Boone, North Carolina

View From The Top, Grandfather Mountain, NC

Over the Labor Day weekend, Janet and I made a 4-day roundtrip drive to Boone in the North Carolina Mountains—home of Appalachian State University—oh yeah, and also at one point home for a guy named Daniel with the same last name. The primary purpose was to do some research for my next book in the Vietnam War Series. So, why “Boone, North Carolina” for a Vietnam War Series book?
Let me begin with this: All my stories contain strong female secondary protagonists. Of the few negative reviews I have received, it seems the major complaint is I don’t stick to the “war” story. To those reviewers, I say “Read Sergeant Rock comic books if you want “war” stories. I write about people, yes in war, but also in love, and the effects of war on their lives afterward. I guarantee to disappoint the “Sergeant Rock” readers with this next novel—tentatively titled The Birdhouse Man. (You will have to read it to understand the title.)
It happens or I should say it begins in Boone because the story is told from the perspective of a seventy-something-year-old Vietnam War veteran as he helps a young history major at Appalachian State write her senior thesis. The novel is actually two parallel stories—the other being the student’s trials and tribulations in a family wrecked by the effects of Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome. The two stories are creating a great deal of “stop and restart” writing in an effort to blend them effectively and keep the narrative flowing. The book should be out sometime next summer.

Cow on a Hill, Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina

Back in ’71, while in the Army 82nd Airborne, I did some training in the Grandfather Mountain area of North Carolina, and we revisited the park there this weekend.

Mountain Lion on Grandfather Mountain

Turns out Grandfather Mountain was a site well worth visiting with a nature museum, a video presentation, guides, and a wildlife display—and oh yeah, the mountain. I highly recommend a week-day or non-holiday visit. Luckily we arrived early, but later in the day, it became very crowded. Also, it is best to know how to read a map. GPS navigation is problematic in the mountains.

I look forward to your comments on this post as well as my Amazon author page. Check it out at https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00H2YO2SS

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