The Gomorrah Principle a Vietnam Sniper Story

A Novel About a Vietnam Sniper in the Phoenix Program

The Gomorrah Principle by Rick DeStefanis about a sniper

Book #2 of this series has been awarded the Readers’ Choice Award for military fiction and is lauded by reviewers as one of the best Vietnam War novels to appear in years. An exciting new thriller filled with gripping tension and espionage The Gomorrah Principle hooks readers from the opening pages, with its ambitious story, multi-layered themes, and complex characters. A story about a young Vietnam sniper, The Gomorrah Principle has the ingredients to become an instant classic among war novels.

When Brady Nash receives a cryptic letter, he realizes that his foster brother may have been murdered in Vietnam and is compelled him to join the military in order to find the truth. Unwilling to explain to his one true love, Lacey Coleridge, why he is joining the army, Brady leaves her angry and grief-stricken. Disavowing their relationship, Lacey turns away to pursue a country music career in Nashville. Only time will tell if she can totally abandon the man she loves, or if he will ever return from Vietnam.

A product of a war fought in the jungles, villages and cities of Vietnam, Brady Nash develops into a sniper of legendary proportions as he faces life and death metered in elements of elevation and windage through a riflescope. Eventually, through his inquiries and his reputation as a sniper, he attracts the attention of a CIA advisor and is recruited to a special operations group. Only then does Brady realize he is no longer the hunter, but the hunted. Caught in a web of espionage, drug dealing, and assassination, his search for the killer has put him on the same hit list as his foster brother.

Learn more about the book’s reviews and awards here.

Gomorrah Principle Purchase Options

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Hardcover
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You may also enjoy my other books below:

Melody Hill: A Vietnam War Novel

Raeford’s MVP: Military Fiction with a Love Story

Valley of the Purple Hearts: Book #4 of my Vietnam War Series

Tallahatchie: Southern Fiction and Dark Comedy

Rawlings, No Longer Young: A Western Historical Fiction Novel

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Recent Posts

I Don’t Write Sergeant Rock Comic Books!

That’s right. I don’t write Sergeant Rock comic books. Let me explain further. This is a recent unrated review I posted on the Goodreads site about my novel Raeford’s MVP:

“This is a love story and a story of finding one’s self and a future after facing the death and carnage of war–the Vietnam War. Billy Coker’s wild high school years led him down the primrose path to the war in Vietnam, and when it was over, he was left staring into the black abyss of PTSS and a futureless life. Little does he realize his redemption may depend on two women: a little six-year-old girl who has lost her father to that same war and a little fat girl he shunned in high school. It is the third book in the Vietnam War Series and one of my favorites.”

(https://www.goodreads.com/author/dashboard)

A novel about love, war and redemption.

You may ask why I would review my own book. The purpose is simple, but first let me begin by saying: There is no rating attached to the review nor is there a recommendation—only a story summary. The reason for the review is to clarify my purpose and style of writing in the Vietnam War Series. I have received a few review comments for Raeford’s MVP and my other works whereby an extremely limited number of readers express disappointment that my stories are not purely “war” stories.

 

Here are a couple of comments: “Is this a War Novel or a Romantic Novel?” (Valley of The Purple Hearts) and “This author…has a tendency to morph a Nam novel into a romance novel.” (Raeford’s MVP). I believe the problem lies with reader expectations. Some want nothing more than stories of combat and its immediate results. The problem with this is two-fold: wars and combat do not happen in a vacuum whereby they affect only the combatants, and the effects of war and combat seldom end when a soldier returns home.

Soldiers have lives before and after they are soldiers, and soldiers have families, wives, and lovers who are just as much a part of their lives as are their combat experiences. And while most soldiers return from combat to civilian lives and move on without outwardly displaying the effects of that experience, most all are changed in some way by it. Frankly, I write my novels to fit these realities and not the voyeuristic pleasures of readers who believe war games like “Call of Duty” or comic books such as “Sergeant Rock” reflect the horrific reality of combat and its aftermath.

With that said, I must caution readers that all these novels do in fact contain very real and graphic descriptions of combat. Many readers have said my stories seemingly place them in such a state of mind that they feel they have participated in the actual combat scenes. These accolades are deeply appreciated, because to understand the entirety of the experience is to better understand the combat veteran, but I stand by my opening statement: I don’t write Sergeant Rock comic books!

Send me your comments, and check out all my novels available in Kindle, paperback and hardcover editions on Amazon.com at  https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00H2YO2SS.

Rick DeStefanis

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